True Stories from New England History/Nathaniel Hawthorne

Today we will still be continuing our run of cataloging books from my personal collection. The book selected is entitled "True Stories from New England History 1620-1803" and it was published in 1906 by the Macmillan Company. Additionally, we will also be looking at the historical record of Nathaniel Hawthorne.

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The Children's Magazine/Sunday School

Today we will be reviewing information pertaining to "The Children's Magazine" - another book located in my personal collection. This book was produced in 1839 by the General Protestant Episcopal Sunday-School Union. From there, we will review information concerning the topic "Sunday school" and its historical aspects.

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Palmer's The Odyssey of Homer/Odyssey

For today's blog, yet again I am sharing some research that I performed on one of the many historical books in my personal collection. The book is entitled "The Odyssey of Homer" and it is copyrighted 1921 by George Herbert Palmer.

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The Mystery of Cabin Island/Charles Leslie McFarlane

Today's topic of research will be related to another book in my personal collection: a 1929 copy of "The Mystery of Cabin Island" by Franklin W. Dixon. This name was a pseudonym utilized by many authors; the first being Charles Leslie McFarlane. 

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The World's Famous Orations/Funk & Wagnalls

Today we will be researching another book from my personal collection entitled "The World's Famous Orations - Volume VI: Ireland" which was published in 1906 by Funk & Wagnalls. 

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The Rise and Growth of the English Nation Vol. II/History of England

For today's blog, I am once again sharing some research that I performed on one of the many historical books in my personal collection. The book is entitled "The Rise and Growth of the English Nation - Volume II (1399-1658)" and it is copyrighted 1901 by historian W.H.S. Aubrey.

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Alexander of Macedon/Harold Lamb

Today I thought I'd share some research I performed on one of the many historical books in my personal collection. The book is entitled "Alexander of Macedon - A Journey to World's End" and it is copyrighted 1946 by historian Harold Lamb.

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Project Hotfoot (Laos)

Today's post will continue exploring military topics. I came across my first reference to Project Hotfoot while studying for class and it has led me to explore more of the specifics of the early days of Special Operations within the United States military.

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Charles Alvin Beckwith

Charles Alvin ("Charlie") Beckwith (January 22, 1929 – June 13, 1994), known as Chargin' Charlie, was a career U.S. Army Special Forces officer best remembered as creating Delta Force, the premier counter terrorism and asymmetrical warfare unit of the U.S. Army, based on his experience serving with the British Special Air Service. He served in the Malayan Emergency and the Vietnam War, and attained the rank of colonel before his retirement.

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United States Army Security Agency

Looks like today will be spent continuing to update the website and add more content. I'll be reviewing some of the information and material that I came across when working on my Intelligence degrees, as there is so much data I am still learning - even years after the degrees were completed. To be certain, I have noticed while looking over my many books, journals, and notes that my collections and work tends to be mainly encompassing historical and military topics. I feel this is mostly likely due to my love of history and personal service within the United States Army working in Military Intelligence.

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Daniel Webster

I'm continuing today with the expanded format for the blog entries. To be honest, the hardest part will be the addition of personal comments as I am unsure what part of the day I will be posting. If it is early - like this morning - I may not have a lot to discuss yet. But perhaps I'll settle into a more comfortable routine in a few days.

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A New Start/Horace Porter

Today I'll be changing up the format for the blog entries. Each entry will begin with an introductory greeting/overview from myself with an accompanying link to the complete entry. Same structure as always but with additional content. These entries will include an audio overview of the day's headlines, followed by any personal insights I may wish to provide (although I may not always include this), and a topic of study I am currently researching. So let's jump in, shall we?

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Phase 3

I can't believe that is has already been two years since I began Phase 2 of my website - the blog component you are currently perusing. This entry marks the beginning of "Phase 3" in the website's direction and it is my intent to start including more audio and video components for my audience. (If anyone even visits my site, that is.) With this being my 50th year of life, I feel it is more important than ever to continuing documenting my adventures, projects, and world. As they say, time marches on.

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Crédit Mobilier of America scandal

The Crédit Mobilier scandal of 1867, which came to public attention in 1872, involved the Union Pacific Rail Road and the Crédit Mobilier of America construction company in the building of the eastern portion of the First Transcontinental Railroad. The scandal was in two parts. The construction company charged the railroad far higher rates than usual, and cash and $9 million in discounted stock were given as bribes to 15 powerful Washington politicians, including the Vice-President, the Secretary of the Treasury, four senators, and the Speaker and other members of the House.

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Whiskey Ring

In the United States, the Whiskey Ring was a scandal, exposed in 1875. The Whiskey Ring began in St. Louis, Missouri but was also organized in Chicago, Illinois; Milwaukee, Wisconsin; Cincinnati, Ohio; New Orleans, Louisiana and Peoria, Illinois. The Whiskey Ring involved diversion of tax revenues in a conspiracy among government agents, politicians, whiskey distillers, and distributors. The scheme involved an extensive network of bribes involving distillers, rectifiers, gaugers, storekeepers, and internal revenue agents. Essentially, distillers bribed government officials, and those officials helped the distillers evade federal taxes on the whiskey they produced and sold. Whiskey was supposed to be taxed at 70 cents per gallon, however distillers would instead pay the officials 35 cents per gallon and the illicit whiskey was stamped as having the tax paid. Before they were caught, a group of politicians were able to siphon off millions of dollars in federal taxes.

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Marcus Antonius Creticus

Marcus Antonius Creticus (flourished 1st century BC) was a Roman politician, member of the Antonius family. Creticus was son of Marcus Antonius and, by his marriage to Julia Antonia, he had three sons: Triumvir Marcus Antonius, Gaius Antonius and Lucius Antonius.

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Marcus Antonius (orator)

Marcus Antonius (Born 143 BC-died 87 BC) was a Roman politician of the Antonius family and one of the most distinguished Roman orators of his time. He was also the grandfather of the famous general and triumvir, Mark Antony.

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Cursus honorum

The cursus honorum (Latin: "course of offices") was the sequential order of public offices held by aspiring politicians in both the Roman Republic and the early Roman Empire. It was designed for men of senatorial rank. The cursus honorum comprised a mixture of military and political administration posts. Each office had a minimum age for election. There were minimum intervals between holding successive offices and laws forbade repeating an office.

These rules were altered and flagrantly ignored in the course of the last century of the Republic. For example, Gaius Marius held consulships for five years in a row between 104 BC and 100 BC. He was consul seven times in all, also serving in 107 and 86. Officially presented as opportunities for public service, the offices often became mere opportunities for self-aggrandizement. The reforms of Sulla required a ten-year interval before holding the same office again for another term.

To have held each office at the youngest possible age (suo anno, "in his own year") was considered a great political success. For instance to miss out on a praetorship at 39 meant that one could not become consul at 42. Cicero expressed extreme pride not only in being a novus homo ("new man"; comparable to a "self-made man") who became consul even though none of his ancestors had ever served as a consul, but also in having become consul "in his year".

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Nobility

Nobility is a social class in aristocracy, normally ranked immediately under royalty, that possesses more acknowledged privileges and higher social status than most other classes in a society and with membership thereof typically being hereditary. The privileges associated with nobility may constitute substantial advantages over or relative to non-nobles, or may be largely honorary (e.g., precedence), and vary by country and era. The Medieval chivalric motto "noblesse oblige", meaning literally "nobility obligates", explains that privileges carry a lifelong obligation of duty to uphold various social responsibilities of, e.g., honorable behavior, customary service, or leadership roles or positions, that lives on by a familial or kinship bond.

Membership in the nobility and the prerogatives thereof have been historically acknowledged or regulated by a monarch or government and thereby distinguished from other sectors of a nation's upper class wherein wealth, lifestyle, or affiliation may be the salient markers of membership. Nobility per se has nonetheless rarely constituted a closed caste; acquisition of sufficient power, wealth, military prowess, or royal favour has enabled commoners with varying frequency to ascend into the nobility.

There is often a variety of ranks within the noble class. Legal recognition of nobility has been more common in monarchies, but nobility also existed in such regimes as the Dutch Republic (1581–1795), the Republic of Genoa (1005–1815), the Republic of Venice (697–1797), and the Old Swiss Confederacy (1300–1798), and remains part of the legal social structure of some non-hereditary regimes, e.g., Channel Islands, San Marino and the Vatican City in Europe.

Hereditary titles often distinguish nobles from non-nobles, although in many nations most of the nobility have been un-titled, and a hereditary title need not ipso facto indicate nobility (e.g., vidame). Some countries have had non-hereditary nobility, such as the Empire of Brazil or life peers in the United Kingdom.

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Quintus Caecilius Metellus (palace owner)

Quintus Caecilius Metellus (born c. 130 BC) was a Roman military leader known for his palace in Tampillium on the Quirinal Hill, which featured a beautiful hanging garden in oriental style, with towers and terraces surrounded by a grove of trees. Other properties he was noted for owning include a house and a tomb at the Fifth Mile of the Appian Way, where he was buried. He was able to afford these luxuries from the favours he received during his campaign in Asia, granted to him by his relative, perhaps his first cousin, Lucius Licinius Lucullus.

Not having issue, he adopted his maternal nephew, son of his sister Caecilia Metella (c. 130–c. 50 BC) and husband Titus Pomponius, Titus Pomponius Atticus; who for that reason became called Quintus Caecilius Pomponianus Atticus.

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