Of Human Bondage/W. Somerset Maugham

Good morning! Today we will be accompanying the usual Morning Brief was an examination of another book from my personal collection - Of Human Bondage. This title was published in 1945 by W. Somerset Maugham.

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Samuel Gridley Howe - Social Reformer (1801-1876)/Samuel Gridley Howe

For today's blog, I am once again sharing some research that I performed on one of the many historical books in my personal collection. The book is entitled Samuel Gridley Howe - Social Reformer 1801-1876 and it is copyrighted 1956 by historian Harold Swartz.

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Barnes New National Reader 4/Alfred Smith Barnes

Good morning! Today we will be accompanying the usual Morning Brief was an examination of a recent gift from my friends Trey and Lisa West - Barnes New National Readers Number 4. This title was published in 1884 by Alfred Smith Barnes.

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Roman Republic

This morning we will be examining the Roman Republic - a fascinating culture from antiquity that is rich in detail and history. 

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Mark Antony

Marcus Antonius (14 January 83 BC – 1 August 30 BC), commonly known in English as Mark Antony or Anthony, was a Roman politician and general who played a critical role in the transformation of the Roman Republic from an oligarchy into the autocratic Roman Empire.

Antony was a supporter of Julius Caesar, and served as one of his generals during the conquest of Gaul and the Civil War. Antony was appointed administrator of Italy while Caesar eliminated political opponents in Greece, North Africa, and Spain. After Caesar's death in 44 BC, Antony joined forces with Marcus Aemilius Lepidus, another of Caesar's generals, and Octavian, Caesar's great-nephew and adopted son, forming a three-man dictatorship known to historians as the Second Triumvirate. The Triumvirs defeated Caesar's murderers, the Liberatores, at the Battle of Philippi in 42 BC, and divided the government of the Republic between themselves. Antony was assigned Rome's eastern provinces, including the client kingdom of Egypt, then ruled by Cleopatra VII Philopator, and was given the command in Rome's war against Parthia.

Relations among the triumvirs were strained as the various members sought greater political power. Civil war between Antony and Octavian was averted in 40 BC, when Antony married Octavian's sister, Octavia. Despite this marriage, Antony carried on a love affair with Cleopatra, who bore him three children, further straining Antony's relations with Octavian. Lepidus was expelled from the association in 36 BC, and in 33 BC disagreements between Antony and Octavian caused a split between the remaining Triumvirs. Their ongoing hostility erupted into civil war in 31 BC, as the Roman Senate, at Octavian's direction, declared war on Cleopatra and proclaimed Antony a traitor. Later that year, Antony was defeated by Octavian's forces at the Battle of Actium. Antony and Cleopatra fled to Egypt, where they committed suicide.

With Antony dead, Octavian became the undisputed master of the Roman world. In 27 BC, Octavian was granted the title of Augustus, marking the final stage in the transformation of the Roman Republic into an empire, with himself as the first Roman emperor.

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I Was Hitler's Doctor/Upton Sinclair

Today's entry will cover an unusual tome in my collection - "I Was Hitler's Doctor" by Kurt Krueger. Published in 1943, this volume includes a forward by Upton Sinclair.

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The Yearling

On this beautiful morning, we will be examining a book from my personal collection entitled "The Yearling" by Majorie Kinnan Rawlings and published in 1938. 

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Farshidenes/Yiddish

This morning I will be providing the usual Morning Brief followed by information related to a book in my personal collection entitled "Farshidenes". This volume was published in 1935 by Hyman Zaner and discusses various Yiddish subject matter.

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Tales from Shakespeare - 1807 - Charles and Mary Lamb

Tales from Shakespeare is an English children's book written by brother and sister Charles and Mary Lamb in 1807.

The book is designed to make the stories of Shakespeare's plays familiar to the young. Mary Lamb was responsible for the comedies, while Charles wrote the tragedies; they wrote the preface between them. Marina Warner, in her introduction to the Penguin 2007 edition, says that Mary did not get her name on the title page till the seventh edition in 1838.

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The Winston Simplified Dictionary/Holt McDougal

Today's item of research is the "Winston Simplified Dictionary" published in 1929 by the John C. Winston Company. We will also be examining Holt McDougal, the modern successor to the company as well as including the Morning Brief by NPR.

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About the Weather/Mark Walrod Harrington

For today's post, we will be performing research on a book in my personal collection entitled "About the Weather". Published in 1905 by Mark Walrod Harrington, this volume is part of the Appleton's Home Reading Books series.

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The Lady of the Lake - 1830- Sir Walter Scott

The Lady of the Lake is an enchantress in the Matter of Britain, the body of medieval literature and legend associated with King Arthur. She plays a pivotal role in many stories, including giving Arthur his sword Excalibur, enchanting Merlin, and raising Lancelot after the death of his father. Different writers and copyists give the Arthurian character the name Nimue, Nymue, Nimueh, Viviane, Vivien, Vivienne, Niniane, Ninniane, Ninianne, Niviene, Nyneve or Nineve, among other variations. At least two different sorceresses bearing the title "the Lady of the Lake" appear as separate characters in some versions and adaptations since the Post-Vulgate Cycle and Le Morte d'Arthur.

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College of Cardinals

Today's blog entry is somewhat more involved than many I have previously posted. However, the subject matter - the College of Cardinals - in fascinating on many levels. 

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Bernardo Dovizi

It looks to be another excellent day! We will start out this entry with some historical research on Bernardo Dovizi.

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Marsilio Ficino

Today's blog will consist of research into the history of Marsillo Ficino

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Giovanni Pico della Mirandola

Giovanni Pico della Mirandola (Italian: [dʒoˈvanni ˈpiːko della miˈrandola]; 24 February 1463 – 17 November 1494) was an Italian Renaissance nobleman and philosopher. He is famed for the events of 1486, when, at the age of 23, he proposed to defend 900 theses on religion, philosophy, natural philosophy, and magic against all comers, for which he wrote the Oration on the Dignity of Man, which has been called the "Manifesto of the Renaissance", and a key text of Renaissance humanism and of what has been called the "Hermetic Reformation". He was the founder of the tradition of Christian Kabbalah, a key tenet of early modern Western esotericism. The 900 Theses was the first printed book to be universally banned by the Church.

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The Works of Nathaniel Hawthorne/Nathaniel Hawthorne

Today selection for analysis is "The Works of Nathaniel Hawthorne" . This edition was published in 1928 by Walter J. Black and includes some of Hawthorne's finest works including: The Scarlet Letter, Twice-Told Tales, and The House of the Seven Gables.

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The Poetical Works of Sir Walter Scott/Walter Scott

Today we will be examining "The Poetical Works of Sir Walter Scott" . This edition was published in 1894 by Helen Barrett Montgomery - a Scottish historical novelist, poet, playwright and historian.

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The New Testament in Modern English/Helen Barrett Montgomery

Today we will be examining "The New Testament in Modern English" . This edition was published in 1924 by Helen Barrett Montgomery - the first woman to translate the New Testament from the original Greek in conjunction with the American Baptist Publication Society.

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Beautiful Joe

Today we will reviewing a very special book in my collection. "Beautiful Joe" was published in 1893 by Margaret Marshall Saunders. Its publication increased worldwide awareness of animal cruelty.

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