George Washington's Surprise Attack/Phillip Thomas Tucker

For today's post, we will be performing research on a book in my personal collection entitled "George Washington's Surprise Attack: A New Look at the Battle That Decided the Fate of America" which was published in 2014 by Phillip Tucker.

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George Washington - The Crossing/Mark Levin

For today's post, we will be performing research on a book in my personal collection entitled "George Washington: The Crossing" which was published in 2013 by Jack Levin.

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For Whom The Bell Tolls

For today's post, we will be performing research on a book in my personal collection entitled "For Whom The Bell Tolls" which was published in 1968 by Ernest Hemingway.

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A Farewell To Arms

For today's post, we will be performing research on a book in my personal collection entitled "A Farewell To Arms" which was published in 1957 by Ernest Hemingway.

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The Sun Also Rises

For today's post, we will be performing research on a book in my personal collection entitled "The Sun Also Rises" which was published in 1954 by Ernest Hemingway.

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United States of Socialism/Dinesh D'Souza

For today's post, we will be performing research on a book in my personal collection entitled "United States of Socialism" which was published in 2020 by Dinesh D'Souza.

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The Life of Admiral Lord Anson/George Anson

For today's post, we will be performing research on a book in my personal collection entitled "The Life of Admiral Lord Anson, and Father of the British Navy, 1697-1762" which was published in 1912 by Walter Anson.

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Fear: Trump in the White House/Bob Woodward

For today's post, we will be performing research on a book in my personal collection entitled "Fear: Trump in the White House" which was published in 2018 by Bob Woodward.

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Southern Gambit: Cornwallis and the British March to Yorktown/Stanley Carpenter

For today's post, we will be performing research on a book in my personal collection entitled "Southern Gambit: Cornwallis and the British March to Yorktown" which was published in 2019 by Stanley Carpenter.

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The Dynamics of Culture Change/Bronisław Malinowski

For today's post, we will be performing research on a book in my personal collection entitled "The Dynamics of Culture Change; an Inquiry into Race Relations in Africa" which was published in 1945 by Bronislaw Malinowski..

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Practical Penmanship/Penmanship

For today's post, we will be performing research on a book in my personal collection entitled "Practical Penmanship, Being a Development of the Carstairain System" which was published in 1832 by Benjamin Franklin Foster.

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Marketing and Merchandising/Alexander Hamilton Institute

For today's post, we will be performing research on a book in my personal collection entitled "Marketing and Merchandising" which was published in 1919 by the Alexander Hamilton Institute.

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The Day is Ours/The Battle of Trenton

For today's post, we will be performing research on a book in my personal collection entitled "The Day is Ours: November 1776 - January 1777 - An Inside View of the Battles of Trenton and Princeton" which was published in 1983 by William M. Dwyer.

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Shoemaking

Shoemaking is the process of making footwear.

Originally, shoes were made one at a time by hand, often by groups of shoemakers, or cobblers (also known as cordwainers). In the 18th century, dozens or even hundreds of masters, journeymen and apprentices (both men and women) would work together in a shop, dividing up the work into individual tasks. A customer could come into a shop, be individually measured, and return to pick up their new shoes in as little as a day. Everyone needed shoes, and the median price for a pair was about one day’s wages for an average journeyman.

The shoemaking trade flourished in the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries but began to be affected by industrialization in the later nineteenth century. Traditional handicraft shoemaking has now been largely superseded in volume of shoes produced by industrial mass production of footwear, but not necessarily in quality, attention to detail, or craftsmanship. Today, most shoes are made on a volume basis, rather than a craft basis. A pair of "bespoke" shoes, made in 2020 according to traditional practices, can be sold for thousands of dollars.

Shoemakers may produce a range of footwear items, including shoes, boots, sandals, clogs and moccasins. Such items are generally made of leather, wood, rubber, plastic, jute or other plant material, and often consist of multiple parts for better durability of the sole, stitched to a leather upper part.

Trades that engage in shoemaking have included the cordwainer's and cobbler's trades. The term cobbler was originally used pejoratively to indicate that someone did not know their craft; in the 18th century it became a term for those who repaired shoes but did not know enough to make them.

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Caesar Baronius

Cesare Baronio (also known as Caesar Baronius; 30 August 1538 – 30 June 1607) was an Italian cardinal and ecclesiastical historian of the Roman Catholic Church. His best-known works are his Annales Ecclesiastici ("Ecclesiastical Annals"), which appeared in 12 folio volumes (1588–1607). Pope Benedict XIV conferred upon him the title of Venerable.

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Danaë

In Greek mythology, Danaë (/ˈdæn./ or /ˈdn/ as personal name also /dəˈn/; Ancient Greek: Δανάη, Ancient Greek: [daˈna.ɛː]Modern: [ðaˈna.i]) was an Argive princess and mother of the hero Perseus by Zeus. She was credited with founding the city of Ardea in Latium during the Bronze Age.

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Age of Sail

The Age of Sail (usually dated as 1571–1862) was a period roughly corresponding to the early modern period in which international trade and naval warfare were dominated by sailing ships and gunpowder warfare, lasting from the mid-16th to the mid-19th centuries.

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Susarion

Susarion (Greek: Σουσαρίων) was an Archaic Greek comic poet, was a native of Tripodiscus in Megaris and is considered one of the originators of metrical comedy and, by others, he was considered the founder of Attic Comedy. Nothing of his work, however, survives except one iambic fragment (see below) and this is not from a comedy but instead seems to belong within the Iambus tradition.

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Maralal

Maralal is a small hillside market town in northern Kenya, lying east of the Loroghi Plateau within Samburu County, of which it is the capital. It is the administrative headquarters of Samburu county. The town has an urban population of 16,281 (1999 census). The market was pioneered by Somali settlers in the 1920s.

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Church of Saint Mary of the Latins

The Church of Saint Mary of the Latins (Latin: Latina) was a church building in the Old City of Jerusalem in the Crusader Kingdom of Jerusalem.

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